December 23, 2019

A letter from Executive Director Chris Hager

This morning, as I pulled on my waders to fish for a couple of hours before heading into the office, I was shocked by the realization that December is nearly over. Reports of winter steelhead hooked on the Clackamas have been few and far between. It seems returns are occurring later than ever. I can’t help but recall stories told of frosty early mornings on the bank where fish were caught before Thanksgiving dinner. I take stock, remind myself that “it only takes one bite,” and push on. As anglers, we push on, driven by a passion that lures us to the next hole or riffle, regardless of run counts or projections. If there are fish in the river, we fish. No matter what. Rain or shine we’re there, one cast at a time. It's that same passion that drives me to preserve these special places, to ensure that the next generation has a place to fish and fish to catch.
November 1, 2019

Snake River Salmon: A Response to Kurt Miller

Miller wants to blame the decimation of Snake River salmon populations on anything but the four lower Snake River dams. So he invokes overfishing that took place 80 years ago and adverse ocean conditions. If those sound like evasions, it’s because they are. Fish biologists agree that removing the dams is the most important step we can take to restore salmon whose populations have dropped by 90% since the dams were built.