January 9, 2020

ACTION: Lower Snake River Workshop

Attend a public workshop in Vancouver on Thursday, January 9th from 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm. The Governor’s office is hosting three public workshops in early January […]
May 28, 2020

Tempering Heat Pollution in the Lower Snake River

Recently, there has been a lot of press about Oregon and Washington governors using their authority under the Clean Water Act to require dam operators to reduce the heat they are introducing into the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Heat pollution causes substantial stress and even death for endangered salmon and steelhead. This is an important development in the ongoing effort to protect salmon and steelhead in these rivers… but what does it mean to reduce “heat pollution” and how does that protect salmon, steelhead and our ability to fish? Heat is explicitly identified as a pollutant under the Clean Water Act, making entities that heat waterways responsible for mitigating the temperature changes they cause. As anglers, we know that temperature changes have huge impacts on fish. Here in Oregon, our water quality standards have set a water temperature threshold of 68 degrees Fahrenheit for salmon and steelhead streams—the warmest water salmon and steelhead can survive in.
June 24, 2020

Renewable Energy and Barging Industries Have Changed

The lower Snake River dams were built based on two predominant assumptions: (1) dams are the most viable form of producing renewable energy and (2) dams facilitate barge transport, which is the best way to ship goods to market. We must determine whether these assumptions are still true today in order to promote a dialogue about crafting solutions to replace the lower Snake River dams.
June 30, 2020

Migration Through the Eyes of a Salmon

When I turned one year old, my parr marks began to disappear, alerting me to the fact that my first great journey would soon begin. I knew it was time to go to the ocean. Under natural conditions, it would be an arduous journey: over 450 miles of river fraught with predators, rapids, strong currents, and changing salinity that culminates in a rapid biological adaptation to the ocean. Unfortunately, man-made obstacles such as agricultural runoff, heat pollution, stagnant water and dams further complicated my voyage.
September 29, 2020

Columbia River Salmon Plan Confined by Outdated Congressional Authorization

The day we’ve been expecting has arrived. The Bonneville Power Administration, Army Corps of Engineers, and Bureau of Reclamation signed their Records of Decision about how they plan to manage the Columbia River Hydrosystem for the next 50 years. The federal agencies cemented their decision to implement a slightly revised version of what was supposed to be a temporary management tool, the flexible spill agreement, despite the fact that all parties involved agreed that it was inadequate for the long term when it was established in 2019.
October 9, 2020

Northwest Governors Announce Intent to Collaborate on Salmon Recovery Will Another Process Prosper or Peril?

Today, the four northwest governors announced their intent to establish a regional collaborative group of stakeholders and tribal sovereigns to investigate opportunities for comprehensive salmon recovery in the Columbia River Basin. This comes one day after the Bonneville Power Administration, Army Corps of Engineers, and Bureau of Reclamation finalizing their multi-year process of developing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System Operations.
October 13, 2020

Our Fishing Heritage is at Risk: Will Our Grandchildren Catch Salmon in the Columbia River Basin?

“The Columbia River is the heart and soul of Oregon, it just is. It pumps through Oregon like the blood in your veins,” said Stevie Parsons, a long-time member, active volunteer, and National Wildlife Federation board member. Many of us throughout the northwest share the sentiment. I spoke to a few of our members to hear about their experiences fishing in the Columbia River Basin.Ultimately, all of their stories centered around one shared concern: whether the fish would persist long enough for future generations to be able to share their experiences.
November 3, 2020

Remove the Dams, Reel in the Profit

Fishing is one of the most popular outdoor recreation activities in the U.S., and a significant source of economic value. In Oregon, recreational angling supports over 12,000 jobs. generates $841 million in retail sales, and provides an economic output of over $1.4 billion. Unfortunately, the populations that support this vibrant economy are at risk of extinction. Salmon recovery isn't just about protecting our fish, it's about protecting our ability to fish in these waters.